London's oldest surviving allotment is facing the threat of being built on thanks to plans by its landlord to construct a new housing development on part of the allotment site. 

We desperately need to raise funds to pay for legal and specialist advice to help save our much loved allotments. 
If you can spare just a few pound we would be very grateful for your help and support.

Our summer open day will be on Saturday 1st July 1pm-5pm. Please come along to see this wonderful place.

https://www.gofundme.com/ealingdean

In early September 2016 the charity, Pathways, contacted plotholders at Northfield Allotments in Ealing to announce its proposal to build on 10% of the allotments. The development would include a five to six story block of social housing and four houses for sale to help fund the development.

Northfield Allotments are the oldest allotments in London. They were given by the Bishop of London to the people of Ealing in 1832, and are held as a permanent endowment. The charity Pathways is our landlord and the site is managed by a committee of seven plotholders. There are 141 plots.

OUR COMMUNITY

The plotholders are a diverse range of ages and nationalities. Twenty nine of our plotholders live in flats – this is their only garden. We have around 50 children who have a safe place to play and learn about fruit and veg and get a chance to see tadpoles, stag beetles, bats and hedgehogs.
There are more than 25 pensioners who have a place to grow their own food and there is always company, someone to talk to. You are never alone when you have an allotment. People are friendly here and we share seedlings and produce.

We have counted 27 different nationalities – the only qualification to getting a plot is a love of gardening and the patience to wait on our waiting list (currently 72 people).

OUR WILDLIFE

The hedgerow around the site is around 900m long and has been designated, by Ealing Borough council, a SINC - Site of Interest for Nature Conservation. It is an important and safe habitat for our hedgehogs, many nesting birds and insects. The allotments are a habitat for stag beetles, which are endangered and protected. With perfect timing the many visitors to our Halloween open day saw our bats flying around the site catching night flying insects.

NO CHOICE?

On the 25th September at a special general meeting, the plotholders unanimously voted to oppose Pathways’ plans to concrete over the allotments.
We understand that social housing is important – but so are green open spaces. It shouldn’t have to be a choice of one or the other. We believe Pathways’ trustees have not fully considered alternatives to their proposal to ‘temporarily’ move 18 residents into what will be a permanent development on the allotments.

We believe a permanent endowment should be permanent.

OUR CONCERN

The original allotments were much larger than they are today: 60% of the allotments were lost in the 1970s due to compulsory purchase by the council and building by Pathways. Our concern is that if planning permission is granted this time around it will be easier to lose more allotment land in the future as the pressure for housing so close to a Crossrail station increases.

When we lose green space we never get it back.

WHAT CAN YOU DO?

  • Please write to your local councillors to let them know what you think of the proposal.
  • Write to the Ealing Gazette and Ealing and Northfield forums.
  • Sign up for our newsletter to keep up to date with what is going on.
  • We need specialist help, especially once the plans are submitted to Ealing Council. This will cost money. So, please help by donating whatever you can to our fighting fund.

Please help us protect the allotments for another 184 years.

Many thanks for all your help and support.

The Ealing Dean Allotment Society.

I’m going to leave the final word to Fran, one of our plotholders (who will lose her plot if the development goes ahead)…

“My allotment means a lot to me - we live in a third floor social housing flat with no access to a garden of our own. In 18 months my daughter and I have transformed the plot from weeds and brambles to our own little patch of heaven and my daughter has learned so much she never would have been able to before, from where our food comes from to the lifecycle of the frog - and she now wants to be a gardener when she grows up.”


As usual, we will be running our volunteer day on the first Saturday of the month. The next volunteer day is Saturday 7th of March (starting at 10.00 am) when we will continue to work on the hedgerow. With your help last month we removed litter and rubbish from the hedgerow all along the right hand side of the main gate. Thanks again for your help, it's made a huge difference! This month we will be doing the same on the hedgerow along the left hand side of the main gate, we would love for you to join us.

Removing the litter and rubbish will improve the look of the site and improve wildlife habitat. We will be removing some of the fencing panels to get access to the mounds of bottles, cans and general rubbish that has accumulated over the years.

We started the Radbourne Walk clean up in February 2014 and held monthly volunteering days on the first Saturday of each month. We worked on one section at a time the volunteers removed litter, rubble, metal, plastic and glass. We found a lot more rubbish than expected and created enough rubbish for two skips. We cleaned the tarmac path to remove muddy puddles and turned over the soil and introduced wildflower annuals to the front section in four main areas. We removed unwanted plant species like Japanese Knotweed and we also added Stag beetle areas with log piles dug into the ground.

In November 2013 Christina Fox came to me with an idea to improve the path that runs beside the Allotments. I will let her explain How it all began . . .
Greater than the sum of their parts. If you try neat gin it's not that great, neither is tonic water. But, when you put the two together you have a winner. Sometimes ideas are like that. One on its own won't go anywhere - but put two discoveries together and you might have something special.
Inspiring moment No 1...

The Radbourne Walk Enhancement Plan
Environment creation
The first of the three main aims in the footpath enhancement plan is to turn this neglected area into a visually attractive and colourful place. To create an immediate impact with plants, I recommend using selective native cornfield annuals. One benefit of using annual plants is that they will grow quickly from seed within one year. Another important benefit of these plants is that in the long-term these species will eventually die out unless the soil is annually turned over.

Saturday 7th February was our first work day of the new year and the first day of our new project to sort out the hedgerow that encloses the allotments. It's a long long time since the hedgerow had been cleared and it was clear to see that a lot of rubbish and other things had accumulated over the years. What better way to start the year than a spring clean? As ever, the work was easier thanks to a bunch of volunteers both allotment holders and other members of the local community.

Northfield Allotments - Hedgerow restoration

Our local council is Ealing... and they have recently launched a new website to encourage local residents to volunteer. 

The site was launched last week and Simon and I were asked to do a short talk to explain our project - the Radbourne Walk.

Simon and Christine - Ealing Dean Allotment Society

It seems that many people want to know how to correctly prune their fruit trees. You may have an old tree that looks like a monster or just bought a new young tree and want to know how to create the best shape for fruit production.

I personally looked at various sources of information in old books and leaflets but i found that videos really gave the best help because you get a chance to see actual trees being pruned in real situations. Also these videos are made professional nurserymen with years of experience in most cases.

I have selected 17 videos, yep i said 17 and if you manage to watch them all i really think you will feel confident in understanding what to do and what NOT to do when pruning fruit tree. Don't just watch a couple then think that is enough, the repetition in the videos helps ingrain the knowledge into your brain . . . i didn't say brain-washing!

Pruning trees

Why does Santa need three allotments?

wheelbarrow in winter - Ealing allotments

So my alarn goes off at 8.00 on Saturday morning and any sensible person would have rolled over and gone back to sleep. But I drag myself out of bed and look out the window....all I can see is frost.

Frosty morning in Ealing Dean Allotments

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